James Muir, DPhil

Adjunct Professor of Philosophy

Email: jmuir@briercrest.ca

Faculty of Arts and Science

Education

BA University of Western Ontario
D.Phil. University of Oxford

Areas of Specialization

History of Philosophy (Ancient Greek, Roman, and medieval Latin and Arabic philosophy, Classical political Rationalism), Political Philosophy, Philosophy and Art

Biography

James was raised in the (then) small town of Paris, Ont., where his family attended the local United Church. He left Paris to earn a BA at the University of Western Ontario, and then lived for four years in Oxford, England, while earning his D.Phil. at the University of Oxford.

At Oxford, he was awarded an Overseas Research Scholarship and an Oxford Blue for his three years on the Oxford Blues hockey team. The highlight of his British hockey career was being given a Man of the Match award in the Oxford vs USAF game for "taking out more of the U.S. Air Force than the peace dividend."

His first child, Melissa, was born in Oxford. Jamie and his family then moved to Cambridge, England, for another four years while his wife completed her PhD, and where his daughter, Heather, was born. His family returned to Canada in 1996 when James accepted a position as Teaching Fellow at the University of King's College, Dalhousie University. While his family lived in Halifax, his first son, Jamieson, was born. In 1998, Jamie moved to the University of Winnipeg, and welcomed his fourth child, Nathaniel. During his time in Winnipeg, he was awarded two Presidential Merit Awards and the Robson Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Notable Publications

James Muir has published over 25 academic articles, book reviews, and conference papers. The two most notable are as follows:

  • "Derrida and Post-Modern Political Philosophy: Ancients, Post-moderns, and the Place of Political Philosophy."European Legacy (Israel), 2008 Vol. 13, No. 3, pp. 425-443.
  • "Is Our History of Educational Thought Mostly Wrong?"Theory and Research in Education, Vol. 3, No. 2, pp. 165-195.

This paper has been widely discussed and translated into French, Korean, and Russian.